Young Black Jack – A Doctor In Training

Black Jack is a doctor gone rouge. Well, he’s rather not really a doctor since he never even got to that point in his training where he finished his education. Even so, he works as a doctor and he’s brilliant at it. This anime is the story of how he came to that decision.

I watched Young Black Jack a while back and have been meaning to write this post for just as long a while but reasons came and then reasons went but now I am ready to talk about my beautiful doctor in training.

Black Jack, or Hazama Kuroo, is a doctor in training. It’s the 60s and revolutions are happening and wars are going on in Vietnam. Hazama has been going through some tough times as a child and as a result his body is filled with scars. Events in his past is what has driven him to want to become a surgeon. I am not fully clear about how he has come to the point where he actually manages to perform perfect operations on people who should be hopeless cases but that he does even though he is a mere student. He gets jobs under the table by already established doctors. He goes to Vietnam even though it is more or less impossible. Things like that.

Hazama is a rather egotistical human being. In the beginning he only does it for the money. He doesn’t care about friends or enemies. But, when he sees an interesting case he can’t help but take it. A face getting transplanted onto someone. A lost leg being sewn back on. An artery slit off in the middle of a shoot out in the jungle. Things like that happen in more or less every episode and Hazama is there with his closest companion; his doctors bag. During the anime his character develops quite a bit; he starts to look at the world around him. He sees the misery and injustice surrounding not only the world at large but the world which he has chosen to work in, and in the end that’s what makes him chose the path he choses.

I am not gonna make a deeper analysis of this anime. All I will say is that I enjoyed it immensely and not only because Hazama is hot, really hot. No, it is a very intense anime, a lot is happening and there are these short arcs built in even though the anime is only 12 episodes. I binged it and I think it was a wise decision in my case. Then again, I have never and will never be much of a week to week viewer so yeah, at least the arcs are nice to watch in one sitting. Another thing I really like was the political stuff going on in each episode. There is a little opening sequence every episode talking a little bit about the state of the world/Japan at that time when the episode is taking place. And, at least as far as I can tell, much of what is happening in the anime is correct as to what really happened back then. Except for the fact that Hazama has these supernatural powers when he operates on people and never fails like ever. He is better than the best and knows every little detail there is to know even though he is in his early twenties with no formal education except those few years he has studied at the university. But, never mind that. The other stuff seems legit.

As always, it seems, when I like something, this is based on a manga by the same name. It is based off of Ozamu Tezuka’s Black Jack and is written by Yoshiaki Tabata and illustrated by Yūgo Ōkuma. Of course there is no English licenses and thus no English translation of this beautiful manga. It would be too much to ask I suppose. I would die for a copy of every volume. I am even considering buying the Japanese version so I can watch the pictures. That’s reasonable, right?

Well, to wrap this up the; if you like Black Jack and want to see whatever he was like in his early 20s and what drove him to become who he is in his 40s I absolutely think you should check it out. If you want to watch a hottie doing magic with a needle and a thread on a severely wounded, half dead soldier on a battle field then this is the anime for you.

This is an anime you can watch even if you haven’t read Black Jack or seen the anime about Black Jack. I have neither read the manga, nor seen the anime. I will though because I somehow can’t get enough of this medical wonderboy that is Black Jack.

Finally; the op is so good.

11 thoughts on “Young Black Jack – A Doctor In Training

  1. I’ve considered buying Japanese manga that aren’t in English JUST for the art… but it’s a slippery slope! I know if I started I probably wouldn’t stop…

    This show looks interesting, I don’t think I’ve ever watched a medical themed anime, I might give it a watch (with the missus of course, I’m sure it won’t take much convincing lol).

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Yeah, I would probably have a problem once I buy that first Japanese manga. 🙄 I am glad I have never been to Japan. I want to go there but I can just imagine go crazy and buy lots and lots of BL manga and djs. So yeah, might be a better idea to not go down that rabbit hole. 🤔

      It is a good anime and yes, watch it with the wife, I think she might enjoy the doctor. He is a joy to watch.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Wait wait wait…I read this review (love it; think I’ll try it) because I read Black Jack manga at my library. It could be out of print and so on, but it made it to the US in English at one point…I’ll sneak over and see if I can find some publication information next time I’m in there.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Actually Vertical Inc. printed the original “Black Jack” by Osama Tezuka back in 2008. I think there’s some copies floating around on Amazon and maybe Barnes & Noble. The new spin off “Young Black Jack” hasn’t been liscened yet. (Sorry, I’m a die-hard for Black Jack I know too much) I doubt YBJ will be translated officially since the original fan base is pretty split on it; YBJ is pretty much a doujin that got the blessing to be turned into a for real manga. It’s sold well, but not well enough or caught a big enough fan base internationally.

    I’m glad someone else watched this series though and enjoyed it like I did! Waiting for new episodes was so hard when I watched originally. I hope you’re able to dig into the original anime too!

    Liked by 1 person

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